Lake Wales Museum
Site and Facilities
Master Use Plan


Prepared for

Lake Wales City Commission

by

Lake Wales Museum Association, Inc.

December, 2015




Introduction

In September, 2014, the Historic Lake Wales Society, as part of an agreement with the Lake Wales City Commission for emergency funding, appointed a Museum Task Force to review operating conditions at the Lake Wales Museum and Cultural Center, and suggest changes that would improve operations and budgeting, and restore public confidence in the functions and services provided by the museum.


In February 2015 the Museum Task Force presented to the Historic Lake Wales Society and the City Commission a concluding report itemizing a number of serious problems and concerns.


As a result of those issues, the City Commission approved the temporary closing of the museum, and asked the members of the Task Force to remain engaged, and charged them with preparing a recovery plan for the future operations of the museum as a public-private partnership. In order to meet that charge, it was necessary to create a new and independent not-for-profit organization, and the Lake Wales Museum Association was incorporated.


Since that date, members of an expanded board of directors have worked to build the Lake Wales Museum Association as a transparent and functional organization that is best able to represent the voices of the citizens of Lake Wales and the surrounding community. The mission of the Lake Wales Museum Association is “to reopen, support, and sustain the Lake Wales Museum and Cultural Center.


The purpose of this Plan is to provide the framework that will allow the Lake Wales Museum to become an active center for the education of our community, and growing numbers of visitors from around the nation and the world. The Lake Wales Museum and Cultural Center can be a powerful resource for our school system, our area colleges and universities, and our entire community.


We envision a Lake Wales Museum of Natural and Cultural History that both teaches and entertains, utilizing current museum technology to provide an interactive educational experience. Achieving the goals set forth in this plan will result in increased visitation and recognition of the Museum as tourist and educational destination, and align with and enhance efforts to re-invigorate the economic climate of Lake Wales.


In order to develop this Plan we have conducted a comprehensive review of conditions at the museum in order to shape a cohesive and comprehensive plan for the utilization of the various structures and assets of the museum. In preparing the documents before you, we have spent countless hours measuring, counting, discussing and planning the steps required to achieve realistic goals. We have been prudent, taking into account the necessary expenses involved in each step, and the opportunities to limit or reduce them , while enhancing the potential for income-generation.


This Plan is strategic in nature, and defers detailed and specific tactical decisions needed to bring it to fruition. It will require continued diligent work, under the capable supervision of Museum Manager Monica Drake Pierce, to complete and enhance this plan with extensive additional information and detail, including the composition of exhibits, security, accessioning, handling and storage policies, and numerous other decisions for which she has the appropriate skill set. The Lake Wales Museum Association has full faith in her capabilities, and looks forward to working with her as she implements the plan and brings our museum to modern standards.


We are very pleased to present this set of documents, which represents hundreds of hours of effort in measuring, assessing, calculating, discussing, and revising, and ultimately incorporates our thorough plans for employing and enhancing the city's museum properties.








Lee Alexander Wheeler II
Chairman

Richard Thompson President

Robert Connors Secretary

Jessica Bray Treasurer

John Adkinson Director

Deming Cowles Director

Linda Truitt Director









Table of Contents

Executive Summary 4
Goals and Purposes of the Plan 7
Existing Conditions 9
Form Follows Function 11
Proposed Internal Uses 13
Needs and Sources 14
Proposed External Uses 15
Phases of Redevelopment 16

Appendices
Appendix I. : Site Overview 17
Appendix II. : The Physical Plant 18
Appendix III. : Rolling Stock 19
Appendix IV. : Conceptual Exhibit Sequence 20
Appendix V. : Needs and Sources Budgets 22
Appendix VI. : Floor Plan Schematic Renderings 24








Executive Summary





The following Site and Facilities Master Use Plan (the Plan) is intended to provide a framework for the redevelopment of the Lake Wales Museum in a way that will best:


Provide a professional-quality museum for Lake Wales;
Create an exceptional museum experience;
Tell the globally-unique story of our geological and biological heritage;
Share the story of both our prehistoric and modern cultures and economy;
Provide a valuable educational resource for the community's schools and colleges;
Generate significant revenue to reduce the need for public funding;


By achieving those goals, the Museum will be in a better position to generate revenue to defer operating expenses. This will also create higher visitor traffic counts in commercial areas, and generate the potential for additional business revenue.
In order to fully assess the potential of the museum, it was necessary to analyze former configurations, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each.
The Museum complex will have several demands upon its space. The most necessary and desirable uses have been identified by our committee. It is important to recognize the practical limitations created by the placement and relationship of the “physical plant” that can be employed by the Museum.
Currently, each of the four existing museum structures are either under or poorly utilized. The Task Force identified five main problems with existing use including:


Limitation of available exhibition space;
Impaired exhibit security and monitoring;
Restricted ability to accommodate touring groups and public gatherings;
Lack of privacy of office and storage functions;
Limited handicap access.




This Plan is designed to reduce, overcome, or eliminate these problems, maximize the usefulness of each space, and realize the museum’s full potential.
It is important to recognize the practical limitations created by the placement and relationship of the “physical plant” that can be employed by the Museum. The property consist of four structures dedicated to the purposes of the Museum, each with its own size, attributes, limitations and potentials. The surrounding vacant lands must also be considered as assets to be managed. In order to create the strongest possible development plan, this plan takes into account those conditions and restrictions in the overall goals and purposes of the plan.
For the purposes of encouraging community use of the museum while generating needed revenue for ongoing operations and enhancements, it is desirable to provide space in which to welcome groups of people, whether for private meetings, or for tours of the exhibits. A successful museum should be a stop for group motor coach tours, and proper facilities make that possible. It is also desirable to provide access to basic refreshments, as well as a shopping opportunity for the acquisition of the souvenirs and memorabilia related to the museum and its history.
The Plan creates specific missions for each building, and specific tasks that will allow each to serve the coordinated goals and identified purposes. It further recognizes the need for changes required in order to provide such basic facilities as handicap-accessible restrooms, and have included a phased construction plan allowing for the expansion of features in keeping with available funding, both public and private.
The Plan also addresses the need for appropriate landscaping of vacant lands along the Historic Corridor, providing for the creation of an educational landscape, community gardens, additional parking, and coordination with allied organizations and adjacent needs.



Goals and Purposes of the Plan


This Plan provides the framework that will allow the Lake Wales Museum to become an active center for the education of our community, and growing numbers of visitors from around the nation and the world. The Lake Wales Museum and Cultural Center can be a powerful resource for our school system, our area colleges and universities, and our entire community.
Several considerations are significant in defining the preferred uses of available museum space. Among them are the ability to accommodate an enhanced learning environment, and a more-entertaining experience for casual visitors and tour groups.
Our plan seeks to achieve the following specific goals:


Maximize exhibition space;
Provide a multipurpose classroom and public-gathering facility;
Generate substantial operating revenue;
Minimize staffing requirements;
Improve visual exhibit security;
Make efficient use of staff and volunteers;
Provide for a highly-visible gift shop;
Make the larger parking lot the primary parking area;
Provide direct access from parking to museum entrance;
Improve handicap access throughout;
Provide a community room;
Provide for service of snacks and beverages;
Provide for a caterer's kitchen;
Improve ease of staff monitoring of gift shop, cafe, and entrance;
Provide space for a future theatre;


Achieving these goals will have the additional benefit of creating an economic engine that will attract visitors and generate increased revenue to defer a larger portion of the operating expenses. This will also create higher visitor traffic counts in commercial areas, and generate the potential for additional business revenue, allowing the Museum to play an important role in the re-development of our core commercial areas.


The Museum complex will have several demands upon its space. The most necessary and desirable uses identified by our committee include:
An expanded and cohesive exhibit area capable of telling, through a series of interactive displays, the long geological, biological, and cultural history of the Lake Wales Ridge;
A Community Room capable of holding small public gatherings of up to 100 persons, both in order to encourage public visitation, and as an important method of generating operating revenue.
An expanded and cohesive exhibit area capable of telling, through a series of interactive displays, the long geological, biological, and cultural history of the Lake Wales Ridge;
A space in which to vend basic refreshments, including bottled water and other beverages, for both the comfort of visitors, and as a revenue generator;
A caterer's kitchen capable of holding hot and cold foods to accommodate luncheon and dinner functions;
A Museum Store, which will allow visitors to purchase memorabilia, and generate additional revenue.
Existing Conditions


In order to fully assess the potential of the museum, it was necessary to analyze former configurations, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each. It is important to recognize the practical limitations created by the placement and relationship of the “physical plant” that can be employed by the Museum.
The property consist of four structures dedicated to the purposes of the Museum, each with its own size, attributes, limitations and potentials. The surrounding vacant lands must also be considered as assets to be managed. In order to create the strongest possible development plan, this plan takes into account those conditions and restrictions in the overall goals and purposes of the plan.


Details of those factors, including square footage, distances, and physical characteristics, are enumerated in Appendices I and II.



During their prior iterations, the facilities presented several limitations, and failed to be employed to their highest and best uses.

All four buildings have been under-utilized, with two remaining essentially vacant during recent years;
The primary space of the 1928 ACL Depot provided poor security in that staff was unable to view the exhibit areas from their work stations, necessitating that they accompany every visitor, or leave valuable artifacts exposed to potential damage or pilfering.
The exhibits offered no logical continuity in their display, and imparted a confusing image to visitors. Space limitations required that unrelated exhibits be displayed within small and adjacent areas. Dolls, doll houses, native American materials, and railroad artifacts were visually intermingled. Many were unrelated to the history of Lake Wales;
The large freight room was often kept locked unless a staff member was available to offer a guided tour;
Office and storage uses occupied much of the most valuable space;
No facilities were provided for the vending of beverages or snacks;
No effort was made during recent years to offer space to groups, or otherwise encourage group use and visitation of the museum, greatly reducing visitation;



Further Observations

The 1919 railroad depot has been in use for several years as home to a model railroad club, and contains an extensive display of railroads and landscapes built through the efforts of former members of the club. Unfortunately, the building is kept under lock and key, and the railroad club is inactive;
The former Crystal Lodge has been used primarily as storage, and has not been employed as an active youth museum for several years;
The Stuart-Dunn-Oliver House has remained vacant for many years, except for rare use as a reception center during community events. It is in need of renovation and termite treatment.

Form Follows Function

For the purposes of encouraging community use of the museum while generating needed revenue for ongoing operations and enhancements, it is desirable to provide space in which to welcome groups of people, whether for private meetings, or for tours of the exhibits. A successful museum should be a stop for group motor coach tours, and proper facilities make that possible. It is also desirable to provide access to basic refreshments, as well as a shopping opportunity for the acquisition of the souvenirs and memorabilia related to the museum and its history.

The total square footage available for practical and safe accommodation of visitors overall is limited, and restricts the ability to provide a fully-functional and inter-active museum that is needed to provide the maximum visitor experience. That irrefutable fact restricts the choices available. In order to achieve the maximum exhibit space for anticipated and potential future uses, it is necessary to create flexible-use spaces to the maximum possible degree.

In the case of each of the four structures on the Museum grounds, we have attempted to assess how it may best be employed within the general framework of this Plan, taking into account its individual limitations, relationship to the other structures, and the overall goals of the Plan.


In order to maximize the value of the museum as an educational tool, our study began with a “blue-skies” envisioning that opened each building up discussion as to its highest and best use and configuration.












1928 Atlantic Coast Line DEPOT

The 1928 ACL depot contains a large open space which was originally a freight room. That space is approximately 26' 7” wide, and 60' 5” long, or 1,606 square feet. It is almost ideal for the purpose of a classroom and public meeting space. It also contains sufficient adjacent space to provide simple snack-bar and catering facilities, and a gift shop, while retaining all under the visual supervision of a single employee when necessary.

The 'freight room' has the further advantage of direct access to the largest of the parking spaces, a large door opening, and an extant exterior wheel-chair lift to accommodate visitors needing assistance.

For practical reasons of monitored public access with limited staff, it is clear that the 1928 ACL depot is the only facility capable of hosting either public gatherings, or exhibits open for daily access. Other smaller buildings would require special staffing, or such uses as may be arranged by reservation or guided tours.

A sole structural negative affecting the 1928 ACL depot is floor elevation, which includes an off-set of approximately thirty-five inches. That fact requires the provision of a wheelchair lift sufficient to meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This facility will be needed regardless of floor plan employed.











CRYSTAL LODGE

In keeping with standard museum practices, accessioning activities should be conducted outside of the exhibit hall, and no artifact should be brought into the Museum until properly assessed and cataloged. In order to maximize the limited space available in the 1928 ACL depot for the primary purpose of telling the story of the community's history, it is essential that office and storage uses be maintained outside of that structure. The Crystal Lodge building, while too small to contain either exhibits or gatherings, is both convenient and of sufficient size to accommodate office filing cabinets, work spaces, and storage, as well as providing space for occasional accessioning activities.












1919 FREIGHT DEPOT

The former use of the 1919 Freight Depot as a home for a private model railroad club does little toward meeting the goals of the Museum. Ownership of the contents, while in doubt, may have fallen to the City, and should be determined. Those contents, if unclaimed, should be offered for sale, and any funds raised utilized as part of the capital improvement plan (See Appendix IV, Needs and Sources.)

As part of Phase II of the Plan, this building should be converted to a theatre for the purposes of displaying a menu of video presentations about the history of the Lake Wales area and its pioneers. Conversion for this purpose could be accomplished with relatively little expense, and provide a significant additional educational resource for students and visitors alike.














STUART-DUNN-OLIVER HOUSE

Long empty and unused, the Stuart-Dunn-Oliver house has suffered due to neglect. Preservation of this significant historic asset would be served by utilizing it. The structure will require treatment for termites, removal of a non-original rear porch roof, repair of water damage in that area, and repair of a handicap-access ramp.

Fortunately, the house is ideally located to provide significant income toward Museum operations if employed as leased property serving a complementary history-themed tourism or visitor-focused purpose. The income generated would readily offset the expense of rehabilitation, and accomplish the primary goal of preserving a significant historic structure for future needs and purposes.








Proposed Internal Uses

The following are specific recommendations and directions.

Maximize the use of the 1928 ACL depot as flexible-use museum Exhibit Hall that will welcome and accommodate groups, including planned community meetings and bus tour groups;
Reverse the layout to provide for a southern entrance into the lobby/classroom, which will also serve as a Community Room to host groups. Exhibits within that space would be limited to two-dimensional displays which would occupy a minimal amount of floor space;
Re-locate back-office and general storage facilities to the Crystal Lodge, where accessioning activities can be easily and securely conducted, allowing for employment of the building as exhibit hall;
Arrange the Community Room to allow for the accommodation of flexible seating, a 'snack bar,' gift shop and other comforts for visitors and events. This arrangement will also allow for the generation of significant and important revenue that will support the museum's mission while utilizing a minimal amount of staff (see Conceptual Floor Plan, Appendix VI);
A logical flow of approximately seventeen exhibits displayed in a chronological sequence, allowing visitors to take “A Walk Through Time;” (Appendix IV) would then proceed through the building in a clock-wise fashion, welcoming visitors to the Lake Wales Ridge, conveying elements of the geological history of the ridge, its natural habitats and species, both prehistoric and modern, and the subsequent waves of human settlement, leading to the founding of Lake Wales.
Upon returning to the lobby, the sequence of exhibits will reach the present time, and provide space for exhibits portraying the present economic and social condition of the Lake Wales area, including current business and industry. This will permit excellent sponsorship opportunity for displays which would be highly-visible during community meetings and events in that multipurpose classroom space.


Needs and Sources
Significant remodeling of the central 1928 Depot will be required in order to meet the proposed internal uses. Among the specific needs are:

An internal wheelchair lift
A new or refurbished external wheelchair lift
New passage door installation at south entrance
Provision of of a casual cafe and snack bar
Build-out of a caterer's kitchen capable of holding hot and cold prepared foods
Partial removal of certain interior walls to accommodate wheelchairs and improve circulation

In order to obtain funding for all or a portion of the necessary work, it is recommended that the City of Lake Wales expedite the sale and removal of the relic switch locomotive, which has no association with Lake Wales and negligible historic value, and the Pullman railroad car, which would require extensive restoration beyond the capabilities of anticipated budgets.

It is anticipated that the sale of that rolling stock would generate funds on the order of $30,000 to $35,000, which will be largely sufficient to meet the cost of needed renovations.

In addition, it is recommended that the potential for the sale of model-railroad layouts and rolling stock apparently abandoned within the 1919 Depot be explored, with any funds realized from such sale earmarked to assist in funding renovations and capital improvements.

Additional revenue will be sought through grants and private fund-raising. Plans are underway to identify sources and programs for that purpose.

Some marginal City of Lake Wales funding through in-kind services may be required.


Please see attached budget projections in Appendix V.


Proposed External Uses




















The narrow parcel of land that lies between the primary cluster of museum structures and the northern Stuart-Dunn-Oliver house is the property of the Florida Midland Railroad (FMR). It contains a single-line spur track that is used for freight service terminating in Frostproof to the south, and joining the mainline railroad at West Lake Wales.
The vacant lands of the Historic Corridor offer another educational opportunity, and should be landscaped with native plants and trees to provide an example of the conditions found by early inhabitants and pioneer families.

A complimenting Master Landscape Plan is presently being developed in conjunction with the City of Lake Wales, Lake Wales Main Street and Lake Wales Library, utilizing other local resources. That plan will provide for the creation an 'outdoor classroom' exhibit of native trees and under-story vegetation representative of the conditions encountered by pioneer inhabitants of the Lake Wales Ridge. This plan will also provide expanded public parking, space available for community gardens and outdoor performances, as well as improved pedestrian security and connection between the primary complex and the remote Stuart-Dunn-Oliver house. The result will enhance the visual appeal of the Historic Corridor.

The old switch-yard diesel locomotive and Pullman railroad passenger car should be removed to be sold as scrap or to a willing restorer. They offer little value to the museum, and the restoration of the Pullman car is beyond the financial capacity of the Museum. The existing caboose is in fair condition, and requires only minor restoration work, and should be retained as an additional attraction.
Adequate space is also available to allow the construction of a small outdoor seating deck at the southwest corner of the 1928 Depot, adjacent to and accessed from the Community Room. This will allow outdoor seating during pleasant weather, and provide an inviting ambiance to travelers and visitors. Space should be retained to allow the one-way passage of vehicular traffic from the south to the north parking and exit, which is important to accommodate motor coaches transporting groups of visitors.


Remove the diesel locomotive and Pullman car;
Conduct necessary repairs/repaving of the parking lot;
Retain and restore the caboose;
Restore the historic 'vest-pocket' park adjacent to the north parking lot;
Design and install native landscaping along the balance of the Historic Corridor;
Provide interpretive signage explaining the native plants and habitat.





Phases of Redevelopment





Phase One

Remove locomotive and Pullman car;
Repair and re-stripe main south parking lot;
Reverse access to utilize south doors and Community Room as lobby;
Construct outside deck at south-west corner of Community Room
Service existing exterior handicap lift;
Install new interior handicap lift;
Build out new caterers kitchen;
Install initial elements of exhibit cycle in south portion of Exhibit Hall;



Phase Two

Relocate office and storage to Crystal Lodge building;
Complete installation of exhibit sequence in north portion of Exhibit Hall;
Create audio guide system;
Restore caboose;
Relocate model railroad layout from 1919 depot;
Install theatre for the screening of videos;
Design landscaping plan for the Historic Corridor;



Phase Three

Complete restoration of Stuart-Dunn-Oliver house and lease for complementary purposes;
Begin production of additional original video materials;
Complete landscaping of the Historic Corridor, install interpretive signage.









Appendices



Appendix I. : Site Overview

The Museum consists of four separate and diverse structures located within a 700-foot corridor. That corridor is flanked on the west by Scenic Highway. Three of the structures are located on the west side of an active single-track railroad line. The fourth building lies at the northern end of the corridor, and to the east of the railroad line, and is therefore distant from the other three structures.

Surrounding lands are owned by the Florida Midland Railroad (FMR), but according to City of Lake Wales staff, a portion of that land is under long-term lease. It is further understood that FMR has no objection to landscaping or other use of the property if a clear corridor is provided within twenty feet of the railway.

The vacant land between the Stuart House and the southern buildings is occupied in part by a dedicated and sponsored park, which is in poor condition. The land between the southern structures and the northern one is vacant, and provides only a starkly barren, shade-less landscape. The distance limits appeal to pedestrian connections. A comprehensive and well-thought-out landscape plan will be an important element of a successful redevelopment plan.




Appendix II. : The Physical Plant

The museum complex consists of four buildings. They are:
The 1928 ACL railroad depot, a masonry structure;
The former Crystal Lodge/Village Library, a wood-framed structure;
The 1919 SAL railroad freight depot, a wood-framed structure;
The Stuart/Dunn/Oliver house, a historic residence, wood-framed;


The four structures are situated in a north-south linear alignment along the railroad.

The largest structure of the four is the 1928 Atlantic Coast Line depot, which has long been used as the principal active building in the complex. It is a masonry structure approximately 28' 4 3/4” wide, and 156' 6” long, and contains about 4,100 total square feet of space, inclusive of interior partitions. That building was formerly used as exhibit space, office, storage, and filing room, and to house a large model railroad exhibit.

Located approximately 130 feet north of the ACL Depot, the former Crystal Lodge is the smallest building in the complex, and is a frame building consisting of three rooms, including a small kitchen and a bathroom, totaling 770 square feet. It was most recently used as storage, but is now largely vacant. It is separated from the 1928 depot by a small parking lot, and connected by a sidewalk.

The 1919 Depot is a frame structure located approximately 175 feet north of the Crystal Lodge building, and across East Johnson Avenue. It includes a small kitchen and two bathrooms. It contains 1,400 square feet, and has been utilized to house a model railroad club, now inactive. It is almost completely occupied by an extensive model railroad layout, which may be relocated to allow the building to serve other purposes as envisioned in this plan. It is connected to the other buildings by a sidewalk that parallels the railroad. This structure will require some replacement of exterior siding.

The above three buildings are all accessed from Scenic Highway.

The Stuart House lies approximately 550 feet north of the 1919 Depot. It is vacant, contains 1,321 square feet, and unlike the other three buildings, has frontage on Central Avenue, rather than Scenic Highway. It offers off-street parking on a grassed lot.







Appendix III. : Rolling Stock

To the east of the 1928 ACL Depot lies a secondary length of track which is segregated from the active line, and currently holds three pieces of rolling stock, including
a caboose
a 1930's-era Pullman car
a 1940-era diesel locomotive

The Pullman car is seriously deteriorated, and its restoration would be cost-prohibitive given the financial limitations of the present museum operations.
The locomotive has no association with the history of Lake Wales, and no historical value to the museum.
The caboose could be restored for a minimal investment, and would prove useful as an attraction.

This plan envisions the sale of the Pullman car and locomotive, and application of funds raised through that sale toward the required capital improvements itemized within, including the restoration of the caboose.


Appendix IV. : Conceptual Exhibit Sequence

1) Florida's Ancient Islands
The introductory exhibit will be located in the community room. It should set the geologic stage upon which Florida's drama plays out, with the rise and fall of sea levels isolating and sculpting the sandy coastal dunes which are today's Lake Wales Ridge.
Potential partners include Ridge Audubon, Sierra Club, etc.

2) Florida's Prehistoric Animals
Focusing upon the mega-fauna of the Bone Valley, this exhibit would feature the fossil evidence of the creatures, big and small, that inhabited our area before the arrival of humans.
Potential partners include Mosaic, the Mulberry Museum, and private fossil collectors.

3) The First Floridians
Largely-speculative depictions of the Stone-Age explorers who first discovered and settled the Florida peninsula. Developed in-house with the co-operation of the Florida State Museum;

4) Pre-Columbian Culture
The story of the diverse tribes that inhabited Florida, with a focus on the Ridge and the interaction with wildlife, agriculture, trade, and technology;

5) The Colonial Period – Land of Four Flags
The arrival of Spanish explorers, the rivalries with France, Britain, native Americans, and the expanding United States;

6) An American Territory / The Seminole Wars
The long tragedy of the series of wars to conquer Florida's last independent tribes, and the place of the Lake Wales Ridge in lore and importance as a reservation and refuge; Invasion of the Ridge by forces of General Zachary Taylor, later president of the United States; (Last Seminole band lived in this area until 1880's);

7) Cow Hunters, Explorers, and Pioneers
The importance of the area in the early development of Florida; the dredging of the Kissimmee River basin, trade with Cuba;

8) Founding of Lake Wales
Establishment of the Lake Wales Land Company, development of the naval stores and turpentine industry, first permanent residents;

9) The Arrival of the Railroads
How Henry Plant and the railroad barons opened Polk County and the Ridge, and connected them to northern markets, first masonry buildings, the development of Mountain Lake.

10) Imperial Polk
The construction of the thin ribbons of 'macadam' roads that connected Lake Wales to neighboring cities, and boosted the economy. The advent of “Tin-Can Tourism.”

11) Citrus Becomes King
The development of the Mammoth Grove, and the sprawling citrus plantations that replaced the pine forests and oak hammocks.

12) Great Florida Land Boom and the “Crown Jewel of the Ridge”
Florida rises to meet its promise as migrants flock south to fill the city; the arrival of the first “tin-can tourists.” The growth of downtown architecture in 10-year period: simultaneous construction of Walesbilt Hotel, Bok's 'Singing' Tower, Saint Anne's Shrine, Webber College, Highland Park, Ridge Manor, Lake of the Hills, Babson Park, Goldenbough, etc.

13) The Great Depression
How the region struggled through the years of hunger and unemployment, the CCC, and theWPA projects that improved Lake Wales. Frederick Law Olmstead Jr.'s landscape plan for the city. The founding of Chalet Suzanne.

14) The War Years
Lake Wales citizens go to war, and the city's role in WWII as host and recreational center for the gunners and airmen training at the Avon Park Gunnery Range and Bartow Air Base. The construction of Hesperides Road and the Vero Beach Highway

15) The Growth of Tourism
The contributions of Cypress Gardens, Masterpiece Gardens, The Black Hills Passion Play, and Spook Hill to making Lake Wales a popular resort destination

16) The Post-War Growth
How Lake Wales returned to prosperity after the war. The “Baby Boom.” The construction of US 27; how the growth of manufacturing changes the city's economy. Development of Warner University.

17) Modern Leadership
How Lake Wales continues to work toward improvement: the growth as retail trade center, Polk State College, Downtown redevelopment, Lake Wales Airport, other assets. This will provide opportunity for exhibition of the names of the organizations and individuals responsible for the creation of the new museum, as well as rotating sponsored exhibits featuring area individuals, businesses, and industries, including citrus, banking, mining, and manufacturing.



Appendix V. : Needs and Sources Budgets














































Appendix VI. : Floor Plan Schematic Renderings

 


Top of Page
This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. 
This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. 
This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear.